An overview of the rate of extinction in the course of evolution and endangered species

External mold of the extinct Lepidodendron from the Upper Carboniferous of Ohio [14] A species is extinct when the last existing member dies.

An overview of the rate of extinction in the course of evolution and endangered species

Contact Author Extinction is a normal process in the course of evolution. Species have slowly evolved and disappeared throughout geologic time as the result of climate changes and the inability to adapt to survive competition and predation.

Since the s, however, the rate of extinction has accelerated rapidly because of human population growth and human resource consumption. The current global extinction rate is exponentially greater than the background normal rate of extinction in the process of evolution extinction rate.

Many biologists believe that we are in the middle of the greatest mass extinction episode since the disappearance of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.

An overview of the rate of extinction in the course of evolution and endangered species

Causes of extinction There are a number of reasons that can contribute directly or indirectly to the extinction of a species or group of species. The primary causes of species extinction or endangerment are habitat destruction, commercial exploitation such as plant collecting, hunting, and trade in animal partsdamage caused by non-native plants and animals introduced into an area, and pollution.

The survival of ecosystems plant and animal communities and their physical surroundings such as forests, coral reefs, or wetlands depends on their biodiversity, or variety of plants, animals, and habitats, as well as the many interactions among these species.

The removal or disappearance of one or several species may irreversibly damage the ecosystem and lead to its decline.

Some of the beautiful species that are extinct are shown below: Ivory-bill woodpecker This elusive woodpecker known to be extinct in s was seen again. On February 11,a kayaker caught a glimpse of a huge and unusual woodpecker in the Cache River National Wildlife Refuge of Arkansas.

The encounter spurred an extensive scientific search for a species that many feared had vanished forever, driven to extinction by the destruction of southern old-growth forests. Further evidence and search proved that at least one of these species is still alive.

They were hunted for their furs and to protect livestock. The last Caspian Tiger reported shot was in In the wild, Quaggas, Ostriches and Wildebeests often grazed together in what was termed the "triple alliance".

However, its limited range made it all the more vulnerable and Quaggas were hunted to the brink of extinction in the mid 19th century by settlers razing sheep, goats and other livestock. The last Quagga died in in an Amsterdam Zoo. Dodo InPortuguese explorers discovered the island of Mauritius and the 50 pounds flightless dodos which supplemented their food stores.

The last dodo was killed in Tasmanian wolf The Tasmanian wolf is not a wolf, but a carnivorous marsupial and a relative of wombats and kangaroos. It even has a pouch.

Tasmanian officials promoting ranching paid bounties to hunters. Believed to be extinct for well over half a century, unconfirmed reported sightings persist.

Cave bear The cave bear lived in Europe during the Pleistocene 1. Their remains have been found in caves where they lived and early humans left their drawings on cave walls. When upright, they stood 12 feet tall. Saber tooth tiger Saber tooth tigers lived in Europe and North America.

They were fast runners for short distances and probably ambushed their prey in packs. The hoplophoneus species lived 20 million years ago. The smilodon species lived during the Pleistocene from 1.

Irish deer Herds of the giant Irish deer lived in Europe and Ireland during the late Pleistocene until about 10, or 11, years ago. It stood six feet high at its shoulders, the size of moose, and its broad antlers spanned 10 feet.

None have been seen since the early s in North America and they were listed as endangered in Carolina parakeet Once abundant, this extinct species nested in large colonies in the cypress swamps in the South Atlantic and Gulf States. Hunted for their feathers and slaughtered as pests, the last reported sighting in the wild was a small flock in Florida in Passenger pigeons Wonderfully prolific, the passenger pigeon had the vast forests of the North as its breeding grounds, and travelled hundreds of miles in search of food.Extinction of a parent species where daughter species or subspecies are still extant is called pseudoextinction or phyletic extinction.

Effectively, the old taxon vanishes, transformed (anagenesis) into a successor, [20] or split into more than one (cladogenesis).Data Deficient (DD) Not Evaluated (NE): (list). Extinctions have continued in historical time • The majority of recent extinctions have occurred in the past years – One species every year during – Four species every year between – Increase in rate of extinction is the heart of the biodiversity crisis • Birds recognized as critically endangered increased 13%.

This risk for extinction can be caused by the introduction of an invasive species to their habitat, habitat loss, or diseases that impact their population's overall survival rate.

An Overview of the Rate of Extinction in the Course of Evolution and Endangered Species. 1, words. 3 pages. At the Brink of Extinction. words. 1 page.

Case Studies

An Overview of the Endangered Species in Australia. 2, words. 5 pages.

An overview of the rate of extinction in the course of evolution and endangered species

Characteristics of the Black Footed Ferret (Mustela Nigripes). Video created by American Museum of Natural History for the course "Evolution: A Course for Educators". You will learn about the role of extinction in evolution, and find out what the relatedness of major groups of living things reveals about the.

Mar 21,  · Extinct Species Of The World. Updated on October 22, Extinction is a normal process in the course of evolution. Species have slowly evolved and disappeared throughout geologic time as the result of climate changes and the inability to adapt to survive competition and predation.

(normal rate of extinction in the process of evolution Reviews:

Conservation genetics and evolution in an endangered species: research in Sonoran topminnows